Our graduates are attorneys, composers, marine biologists, entrepreneurs, teachers, organic farmers, artists, writers, social workers, doctors, veterinarians, molecular geneticists, professors, and public policy experts, among so many other things.

COA’s emphasis on field research, independent study, interdisciplinary thinking, and internships helps our graduates to become leaders and decision-makers wherever they go.

Within one year of graduation:
  • 26% of COA alumni have gone on to graduate school,
  • And 54% are working at a job in their field.
Within five years of graduation: 
  • More than 60% of COA alumni have gone on to pursue graduate studies.


Before graduation…

100% of COA students complete a 450-hour internship
100% of COA students design and implement a capstone senior project

Employers include:

Center for International Environmental Law
Chicago Botanical Gardens
Birdsong Farm
Edward Jones Financial Services
Fiddleheads Forest School
Greenpeace
Maine Biofuels
Museum of Science, Boston
National Park Service
Norman Rockwell Museum
Perkins and Will Architects
The Jackson Laboratory
The Nature Conservancy
UNICEF
United States Congress


Most frequently attended graduate schools include: 

American University, Boston University, College of the Atlantic, Columbia University, Cornell University, Duke University, Harvard University, Northeastern University, University of California, University of Copenhagen, University of Maine, University of Southern Maine, Yale School of Forestry

 

Read our complete alumni report: “Beyond COA”

 

Alumni in the news

  • NEWS
    Changing So what? to Aha!

    As deputy chief of interpretation at Acadia National Park, Christie Denzel Anastasia ’92, seeks to ensure that every visitor intersecting with the park has the best experience possible. What this means is that Christie spends a lot of time behind a computer so that the seventy-odd rangers, volunteers, interns, and partnership program staff she oversees can be outside, doing their jobs.

  • NEWS
    Seeking Acadia’s Bats
    Acadia’s bats are suffering from the often deadly fungus known as white-nose syndrome. Erickson Smith ’15 joined a team of scientists surveying and measuring the bats in hopes of protecting them.
  • NEWS
    Crossroads of Cuisines Spices Up the Menu at Sri Lankan Restaurant [Bangor Daily News]
    Serendib, a new restaurant created by College of the Atlantic alumni Sanjeeva and Menemsha Abeyasekera ’08, garners local acclaim.
  • NEWS
    How Passion for Local Food Production Sustains [Farmer to Farmer Podcast]
    The popular agricultural podcast features Birdsong Farm owner Matt Herbruck ’94 as he shares his experiences in engaging with start-up farmers markets, moving his life across the country, and more.