Steve Ressel, left, is a professor of zoology and biology at College of the Atlantic, also serving as the Museum Director at the college's <a href="/dorr-museum/" target="_blank">George B. Dorr Museum of Natural History</a>. Amidst his heavily field-based courses taught at COA is <a href="/live/profiles/1823-costa-rican-natural-history-conservation" target="_blank">Costa Rican Natural History & Conservation</a>, which culminates in a two-week immersion in Costa Rica where students study the local biological systems and the country's climate of conservation.Steve Ressel, left, is a professor of zoology and biology at College of the Atlantic, also serving as the Museum Director at the college's George B. Dorr Museum of Natural History. Amidst his heavily field-based courses taught at COA is Costa Rican Natural History & Conservation, which culminates in a two-week immersion in Costa Rica where students study the local biological systems and the country's climate of conservation. Credit: Jason P. Smith

This past August, I had the good fortune to visit Piro Biological Station for a few days. Piro was one stop on a seven-day scouting trip with another colleague where we explored different areas in the Osa for a future tropical ecology course. My days at Piro BioStation were few in number and mostly filled with logistical considerations associated with bringing students down to the Osa. However, I still left overwhelmed by the amount of biodiversity I saw during my brief, busy stay. I did have one thing in my favor, it was the rainy season and amphibians are my thing; the frogs did not disappoint.

My last day and night at the field station stands out in particular, because of the torrential rain the night before made all of the surrounding forest dripping wet for the next 24 hours . As the rain poured down, Manuel started thinking that it may be enough to prompt another round of explosive breeding in Agalynchis spurrelli(The Gliding Tree Frog) and he suggested that we head out early in the morning to see if that indeed was the case. It wasn’t, but I was blown away by the number of egg masses clinging to vegetation from previous mating bouts. Upon close inspection, I saw that many of the eggs contained well developed, squirming tadpoles.

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