• Burrow Distribution and Habitat Parameters in Leach’s Storm Petrel

    by: Anna Caroline Perry
    Burrow Distribution and Habitat Parameters in Leach’s Storm Petrel

    Historically, efforts to estimate nesting populations of Leach’s Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) have produced variable results.

    On Great Duck Island (GDI), census numbers for this species have ranged from 800 to 16,000 breeding pairs (Ambagis 2002). In the most recent census for GDI, Ambagis (2002) calculated that the island supports 9,300 + 6,500 pairs. The high degree of variation in these population estimates may reflect the patchy distribution of this species’ inconspicuous nesting sites, or burrows. To increase the accuracy of future census efforts on GDI, this study sought to refine a model that would account for the distribution of petrel burrows on the island.

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  • Predation on Common Eider Ducklings on Great Duck Island

    by: Sarah E.A. Spruce
    Predation on Common Eider Ducklings on Great Duck Island

    Since the 1920s, Great Black-Backed Gulls have increased in frequency in the Gulf of Maine, raising concerns over possible effects on Common Eider populations from over-predation.

    In order to assess whether predation rates on ducklings by Great Black-Backed Gulls are affected by human disturbances, particularly researcher created disturbance, we observed a Common Eider nursery from a vantage point that nullified observer effects.

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  • Preferential Utilization of Rocky Coastline Habitat by Herring Gulls

    by: Aspen Reese
    Preferential Utilization of Rocky Coastline Habitat by Herring Gulls

    The Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) has an extensive Holarctic distribution encompassing many habitat types. In order to isolate possible factors contributing to nesting site selection, this study analyzed the effects of territoriality concerns, presence of nesting Great Blackbacked Gulls, and chick survivorship as a function of habitat choice.

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  • Tracking Derelict Fishing Gear: A Buoy Island Map

    by: Robin Owings
    Tracking Derelict Fishing Gear: A Buoy Island Map

    An ongoing study of drift patterns of lobster buoys and other marine flotsam in order to determine the distribution and origin of marine debris in the Acadia region. During the summer of 2011, 1517 buoys were photographed and documented on Great Duck Island (GDI). These buoys have subsequently been mapped based on likely points of origin according to ownership patterns.

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