Candice Stover (lecturer)

Candice Stover
207-288-5015, ext. 5815 | candice@prexar.com


B.A. Northeastern University, 1974
M.S. Pennsylvania State University, 1976







 



Courses Taught

HS2025A Woman's Place: In the Poem, at Home, on the Road

The place "no map could show  . . "  So Adrienne Rich describes the moment igniting one poem of a traveler in this genre on the page. Just where is a woman’s place? Where does she come from? What does she leave or return to? How does she remember, observe, and name the worlds she is and the worlds she discovers in the shape and making of a poem? These questions will accompany us both as points of departure and anchors for discussion in reading poems from women inviting us to track the seasons on a Cumbrian sheep farm, taste raspberries in the snow in Moscow, muse on home by a waterfall in Brazil, enter a Polish café with a terrorist, and turn circles barefoot on a Vermont hillside. For every poem we share, seeing and articulating the architecture will be primary. Please come prepared to read closely and aloud, to name what strikes you as a reader developing a vocabulary of critical precision and the moment’s truths, and to gather a portfolio of original poems tracing your journey to this place with no map but the words you find.

Level: Introductory/intermediate. Class limit: 15. Lab fee: $20.

HS2035Classic Shorts: Changing Weather

Weather as fact. Weather as atmosphere. Weather as metaphor. The seasons of change on our planet, in a lifetime, evolving. Heat, dust, natural disasters, questions of fertility, water, human intervention. Who survives what, what grows or doesn't, where and how. The short story offers a lens on all of these, and the elements we'll encounter in this section of Classic Shorts will lead us into discussions meteorological, contemplative, and literary. What happens if the sky starts raining yellow dust-fallout or pollen? Who is or isn't on the Moscow train the summer a family lives in a village house fifty feet from the railway station and why does this summer, this setting, matter? Bonfire conversations on a beach following an earthquake in Japan, lies that lead to truths and layers of memory in the chill of an Etruscan museum, dark storms and unexpected harvests in a Pakistani servant girl's life, an Irish spring and the healing destinations of a priest on someone else's wedding day-these are among the stories we'll discover and explore as architecture in this genre William Trevor calls "the art of the glimpse... an explosion of truth... concerned with the total exclusion of meaninglessness" and which Margaret Atwood describes as "a score for voice... keeping faith... with the language... told with as much intentness as if the teller's life depended on it."  Seeing and articulating what we believe about how each story is made-its characters and landscapes, gestures and metaphors, the instincts and technical decisions behind every page-will be part of our daily weather. Students will be expected to gather and develop critical inquiries story by story, with a midterm conference and final paper (original short-story option encouraged) required. Evaluations will be based on the attention to language as precision and possibility in this deliberately contained form-what level of risk, what quality of articulation and follow-through to see and shape a story? Please come prepared to read closely, discuss openly, and experiment in the art of the glimpse.

Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: none. Class limit: 15.  Lab fee: $25. Meets the following degree requirements: HS

HS743Classic Shorts: Money, Honey

A young woman who needs a job. A boy who steals. The ethics of a corporate franchise across cultures; an elder who will give away a cure for snakebite-but not sell it. The cost of electricity in Islamabad. A clash of values between brothers. A gamble. A bet. These are some of the characters and incidents we?ll encounter in this section of Classic Shorts, as well as the questions they lead us to weigh and contemplate. What would-or wouldn't-you do for money? Have you ever cheated anyone? What do you consider priceless in the green, green worlds of this fragile planet we share? How do you define "rich," "poor," "enough"? Our focus on this genre-the one William Trevor calls "the art of the glimpse"-may not take us all the way to Moneta, that temple of Juno in Rome where money was coined, but it will invite us into the literary territory of how writers develop a scene, secure a metaphor, and offer us as readers the tremendous wealth of discovering and naming some of fiction?s truths. Please come prepared to read closely, discuss openly, and experiment in the art of the glimpse. Critical inquiries, midterm conference, and final paper (original short-story option encouraged) required. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Class limited: 15.

HS2031Classic Shorts: Saving Places

"What place has place in fiction?" Writer Eudora Welty offers us this question in an essay she wrote in 1954, then goes on to contemplate: "Location is the crossroads of circumstances . . . the heart's field . . . identity. . . . Place, to the writer at work, is seen in a frame. . . . a brimming one." What brims in this frame, Welty says, is not only a place of "original awareness"-our roots and where they can lead us-but also how "one place comprehended can make us understand other places better." How many ways to measure the distance "between the localized raw material of life and its outcome as art"? What places might a story help us save? Where and how do we recognize the places that save us? What is-and isn't-present? In this section of Classic Shorts, we'll navigate these questions through the genre, as the writers and stories we'll encounter take us from a camping trip by a river to follow the currents of memory to the terrace of a Roman restaurant where two old friends unexpectedly disclose their pasts. A blind date at a carnival in Ireland, a safe house in South Africa turned perilous, a dance floor with a drunken cowboy in Montana-these are among the places we'll visit, saved by a writer on the page. We'll also consider how some literal means of transport-a rental car, a train compartment, a piece of furniture deliberately left behind-can preserve atmospheres and become the architecture for what William Trevor calls "the art of the glimpse" in describing the short story ("an explosion of truth . .  . concerned with the total exclusion of meaninglessness") and which Margaret Atwood references as "a score for voice . . . keeping faith . . . with the language . . . told with as much intentness as if the teller's life depended on it."  Is it possible for a life to depend on a place? A sip from a cup of pure spring water. A friend or stranger in need of comfort. How one generation holds its origins, landmarks, and destinations to deliver to another in the brimming frame of a story.

Seeing and articulating what we believe about how each story is made to save what it contains-its characters and landscapes, gestures and metaphors, the instincts and technical decisions behind every page-will be part of our daily navigation, including a weekly out-loud story lab. Students will be expected to gather initial responses and develop critical inquiries story by story, with a midterm conference and final paper (original short-story option encouraged) required. Evaluations will be based on the attention to language as precision and possibility in this deliberately contained form-what level of risk, what quality of articulation and follow-through to see, shape, and save a story? Please come prepared to read closely, discuss openly, and experiment in the art of the glimpse.

Level: Introductory/intermediate. Prerequisites: none. Class limit: 15. Lab fee: $25. Meets the following degree requirements: HS

HS791Classic Shorts: What's on our Plates

Questions of appetite. Questions of sustenance. Questions of nurturing. What's on our plates is"inevitably" filled with such questions, with food as primary source and sensual delight, with food as geography and climate, culture and economy, fact and metaphor. The short-story writer who includes anything about what's on our plates also invites us to consider food memories and associations of every kind: where our food comes from, who prepares it and how, who we do or don't share it with, what grows where in a season of bounty, what?s absent in a time and place of deprivation, drought, violence. The stories we'll read include a devastating announcement at a family luncheon in Brazil, the diets of a fat girl who hungers for love, what?s on the menu at a backyard restaurant in a mid-level Haitian slum, a journey to a shrimp shack south (south!) of New Orleans, a roof-top job for a California grocery store, an anorexic's visit to a hammam in Paris, the slaughtering of a pig post-Chernobyl, and a monkey in an Argentinean kitchen. Our focus on this genre -- the one William Trevor calls "the art of the glimpse" -- will also provide many different tastes of how writers develop a scene, simmer a metaphor, and serve us as readers discovering and naming some of fiction's truths. Please come prepared to read closely, discuss openly, and experiment in the art of the glimpse. Critical inquiries, midterm conference, and final paper (original short-story option encouraged) required. Level: Introductory/intermediate. Class size: 15.

HS2037Classic Shorts: What’s in Our Hands

The question of what’s in our hands is, of course, tangible and practical, metaphorical and ecological. What we hold in our hands is one way to show what we value, what we (or someone) believe(s) we need, what connects us. Keys and spoons, tickets and toys, tools and weapons, instruments and electronic devices, what grows and what we plant, gifts. A story is also something we can hold in our hands, and in this section of Classic Shorts, stories will invite our attention to this genre one writer (William Trevor) has called “the art of the glimpse” and another (Margaret Atwood) describes as “a score for voice . . . keeping faith . . . with the language . . . told with as much intentness as if the teller’s life depended on it.” These stories in our hands include unexpected treasures found by kids digging in a hole on family ground, the glitter of opals and other beliefs hidden on Aboriginal land, a ship’s cargo of specimens from the Amazon, the healing root of an African plant, a notebook of musical instruments, the jacket of a friend departed, and an offering of lemon poppyseed cake. [How] does what’s in our hands keep and sustain us?

Seeing and articulating what we believe about how each story is made—its characters and landscape, gestures and metaphors, the instincts and technical decisions behind every page—will be central to our work, including a weekly out-loud story lab. Students will be expected to gather initial responses and develop critical inquiries story by story, with a midterm/story conference required and a final portfolio of original fiction. Evaluations will be based on attention to language as precision and possibility in this form deliberately made to contain “an explosion of truth . . . concerned with the total exclusion of meaninglessness” (Trevor again). What level of risk, what quality of articulation and follow-through to see, shape, and hold a story? Please come prepared to read closely, discuss openly, and experiment in the art of the glimpse.

Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: none. Class limit: 15. Lab fee: $25.  Meets the following degree requirements: HS

HS2029Great Letters

Greetings and salutations!  This course is designed for those who still believe in writing letters or perhaps are curious because they've abandoned (or never even tried?) the act-and art-this genre offers us to connect with a writer's audience, material, and voices living on the page. "How we communicate is the nature of who we are," Sven Birkerts wrote in his 1994 book The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age. Almost two decades later, when e-mail, text-messaging, and blogging punctuate the day and put not a handwritten page, but the world, at our fingertips, is letter-writing really dead? The mail we'll open in collections we'll read includes letters from a writer born on Gott's Island (Ruth Moore), writers finding themselves between roots in New England and travels to New York City and Brazil (E.B. White and Elizabeth Bishop), writers witnessing in war zones (Virginia Woolf and George Orwell), and a painter, poet, and social activist articulating some of the passions and questions of their vocations (van Gogh, Rilke, and Jessica Mitford). In addition to reading these letters, out loud and on the page, we'll learn some epistolary vocabulary and practice the art of all it can express as we gather our own collections of letters describing our origins, locating ourselves between travels, claiming our politics and our hearts' convictions, doing our business, and revealing the times we live in at perhaps another pace and value of resonance. Reading responses, mid-term conference, and final portfolio required.

Level: Introductory/intermediate.  Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.  Class limit: 12. Meets the following degree requirements: HS

HE1010Human Ecology Core Course

Human Ecology is the interdisciplinary study of the relationships between humans and their natural and cultural environments.  The purpose of this course is to build a community of learners that explores the question of human ecology from the perspectives of the arts, humanities and sciences, both in and outside the classroom.  By the end of the course students should be familiar with how differently these three broad areas ask questions, pose solutions, and become inextricably intertwined when theoretical ideas are put into practice.  In the end, we want students to be better prepared to create your own human ecology degree through a more in depth exploration of the courses offered at College of the Atlantic.  We will approach this central goal through a series of directed readings and activities.

Level:  Introductory.  Lab fee: $25.  Meets the following degree requirements: HE

HS3019Mountain Poets of China and Japan

There was a long standing tradition in both China and Japan of wandering poets and mountain hermits who expressed their experiences in nature in poetic terms. In this class we take an overview of the major styles of poetry in both of these countries and sample some of the work of their major poets. After a brief introduction to the use of dictionaries and various language tools available in books and on the internet, students will be invited to try their hand at translating some of the Chinese poems and rendering them into good poems in english.

Level: Intermediate.  Students will be expected to take the course on a Pass/Fail basis, with special arrangement made for those needing to take it for a grade.  Class limit: 12.  Meets the following degree requirements: HS